going bananas

yoong soon enjoying a pisang goreng breakfast with dad

Yesterday, a huge, I mean a very huge bunch of bananas was delivered to us on a wheelbarrow by Yong Soon, Stevie’s cousin who is also our immediate neighbour in Tanjong Minyak. His family is not a great fan of plantain, while Coco and I love this fruit and it’s culinary versatility.

While cutting them into combs for easy distribution, I overheard pisang goreng being uttered by my father-in-law.

I woke up this morning knowing I must make some pisang goreng for dad before leaving for Kuala Lumpur.

However, there is this battle of the batters: should I use a crunchy recipe I have stumbled-upon online, or should I use Momsie’s simple batter recipe that is equally inviting?

Looking at the insane amount of bananas, I decided to make both.

golden and crunchy

I can’t tell the difference between the flavours of the 2 batters used. As for the texture, my vote goes to batter recipe picked from The Malaysian Cuisine.

a heart of gold, sweet and delicious

The Chans were quickly snapping up these golden fritters. The light crunch outside and sweet sourish soft pulpy flesh inside literally made me go bananas. You just want more!

Anyway, 2 giant combs came home with us. I am seriously itching to ditch out some delicious banana snacks for my friends in Kuala Lumpur.

Banana Fritters or Pisang Goreng Recipe

picked from The Malaysian Cuisine

INGREDIENTS:-

  • 2 Medium Ripe Bananas (Pisang Tanduk) preferred
  • oil for frying
BATTER:-
  • 100 g All-Purpose Flour
  • 50 g Rice Flour
  • 1 Tbsp Sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 1 Cup Water

METHOD:-

  1. Combine all ingredients for the batter and mix well.
  2. Pour enough oil into a wok on a medium heat.
  3. Slice bananas into desired serving size.
  4. Coat bananas with batter and fry till golden brown in colour.
  5. Remove and drain on paper and serve while warm.

spring with Mrs. Chan

While affixing plastic peach blossoms onto her water jasmine plant, Momsie proudly advised me what’s blooming in her sporadic garden.

Then with her chin, she proudly pointed to me a ‘must see’, her prized wild ginger flowers.

I was expecting the magenta button ginger flowers we commonly find decorating in hotel lobbies and spas. But what I saw were two potted plants with very large majestic flaming tangerine petals with a pale, waxy honeycomb centre. They look unreal from a distance.

A few years ago, Agnes brought home a Chinese New Year’s hamper decorated with a few stalks of fresh exotic flowers. Momsie liked the flowers very much and decided to grow them and this is the result from that love-at-first-sight.

Googled but failed to find out it’s name.

Regrettably, I do not know the name of these brightly coloured flowers, but momsie calls them “Japanese Flowers”. There is a 3 feet by 6 feet patch of this flowers right behind our clothes line. They attract many bees, butterflies and dragonflies as they bloom in bursts of vanilla yellow, fuchsia and rosy red.

Lookie here, so pretty are these chillies! I laughed my head off when momsie told me that they were grown from the seeds she had saved from the last batch of dried chillies used for making her sambal.

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Pineapple Tarts

Mom likes to keep things simple, and improvises a lot.  She prefers to learn from her friends tips on this and that instead of referring to recipe books because they are “too complicated.”

And her favourite go-to person is Ang Cho.

Ang Cho is widely regarded as the grandmaster of kueh-making in our kampong, and has no peer in this department. At a distant second would be a man named Nam Hua, a baba who makes very high quality nyonya kueh as a home business.

Mom is very close to Ang Cho, a recent breast-cancer surviver who lives a stone’s throw away.

Ang Cho never use ready-made rice flour that comes in the bags. She mills her own, at home, using heavy granite mill, like we used to do too, when grandma was alive.

Although mom is not as meticulous as Ang Cho, there is a certain art to her seeming chinchai-ness.

And that very chinchai-ness gives her culinary a charm unreplicatable.

RECIPE for Pineapple Tarts

makes more than 100

INGREDIENTS:-

  • 1 kg of flour
  • 500 grams of margarine (set aside some to line on trays)
  • 13 eggs
METHOD:-
  1. Heat oven at 160 degree Celsius.
  2. Sieve flour into a large bowl for kneading.
  3. On the side, crack 8 eggs and beat them lightly but even.
  4. Slowly add the margarine and pour beaten eggs, use your fingers lightly to combine them.
  5. Lightly knead and form them into a few manageable portions.
  6. Set aside a small portion to be cut into tiny strips for decor.
  7. The balance 3 eggs to separate and beat the yolks for glazing.
  8. Use a large piece of polystyrene to roll out the dough.
  9. Use the tart cutter and form the tart base.
  10. Glaze egg yolk over the dough before placing the pineapple jam inserts.
  11. Decorate with trimmings for presentation as necessary.
  12. Glaze egg yolk over trimmings.
  13. Bake for 20 minutes.

RECIPE for Pineapple Jam 

INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 bowls of scraped pineapples
  • 3 bowls of sugar

METHOD:-

  1. Skin pineapple and scrape out the flesh. Drain flesh on a sieve for 10 minutes to obtain ½ cup of juice.
  2. Place the scraped pineapple flesh in a non-stick pan and add granulated sugar and pineapple juice.
  3. Place pan over low heat and cook, stirring occasionally for about ½ hour until pineapple jam is sticky.
  4. Set aside to cool.